Sunday, November 25, 2012

GB Glace Lakulätkä Lakrits Puck

It was Thanksgiving Weekend here in the states, and one thing that I'm thankful for is that I'm no longer in Sweden. You see, I've been traveling quite a bit these past several months and Sweden was unfortunately on my itinerary. It's not that I have a problem with Sweden, the Swedes, or even Swedish Meatballs, it's that Sweden is right next to the dreaded homeland of Salmiak: Finland.

Fortunately, I was as far away from Finland as possible (Malmö), but I could not escape the long arm of Finnish delicacies. On my way back to Denmark, I stopped at the grocery store at the train station to find an absurd amount/variety of yogurt, a strange obsession with condiments in metal tubes, and – as you probably guessed – plenty of salmiak.

One thing that caught my eye was in the freezer section. Amongst a bunch of seemingly good-tasting ice cream treats, I spotted this:

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My Swedish is a little rough, but "Lakulätkä Lakrits Puck" roughly translates to "ground-up hockey puck", and is apparently how they describe the flavor of salty licorice. After confirming that the ingredienser did indeed list salmiak, I opened up the package to find this appropriately hockey-puck shaped ice-cream bar.

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I figured that nothing could ruin ice cream, so I took a big bite of the Lakulätkä. I figured wrong. The ice cream portion of the bite melted pretty quickly, leaving a half-melted candy coating to chew on. It was a lot like those chocolate-covered icecream bars, except that it was covered in awful.

The candy coating had an impressively strong taste that came roaring in after a few seconds. I was a bit hungry, so I took another bite figuring that the taste couldn't get any worse. And once again, I figured wrong. The taste of cheap salmiak candy coating quickly overwhelmed me, and I threw the remainder of the puck in the nearest rubbish bin.

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The taste stayed with me halfway to Copenhagen, and took nearly half a pack of gum to finally rid myself of. Considering that the Lakulätkä Lakrits Puck was mostly ice cream, I'll rate it as almost edible.

10 comments:

  1. At least you knew what to expect, unlike this one: http://www.emptytriangle.com/archive/41

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  2. Eventhough this really is a swedish product, it really is one of my favourite icecreams. Delicious mmm :P~

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  3. Ahh! The good old hockey puck ice cream. When we visited Sweden (from Norway) during summer holidays we always bought that one. Haven't tasted it since I was a kid.

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  4. Bah, you should have visited Finland on your way. On that thing the ice cream doesn't actually taste like salmiak :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJBBakWOeEQ

    Maailman vihatuin = World's most hated
    Suomen rakastetuin = Finland's most loved

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  5. It looks like there's vanilla ice-cream inside and just the coating is salmiak... There's also that kind of ice-creams where under the coating there's salmiak-ice-cream http://lh5.ggpht.com/-p6DbSAnxl4E/TkZ2LPnKk9I/AAAAAAAAAXY/Be_9GK2FBY4/DSC02563.jpg (the picture isn't mine) Even tho i love salmiak and ice-cream, they shouldn't mix and i don't eat those, they're terrible.

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  6. You monster! Throwing away a perfectly good ice cream.

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  7. Lakulätkä sounds Finnish to me, it's definitly not Swedish anyway.

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  8. Lakulätkä is finnish. Laku is a shorter name for lakritsi, which means licorice. And lätkä means hockey, so the translation for lakulätkä is licorice-hockey :D and that's a good ice-cream! :D

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  9. You definitely should have visited Finland, the land of salmiakkikossu. Savouring the subtleties of salmiak and Finnish vodka mixed together... Ahh.

    It's like our local tequila, but all self-contained: no need for salt nor lime.

    BTW, lätkä also means puck.

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