Thursday, February 25, 2010

Tyrkisk Peber: Firewood

What a better way to start off this Salmiak review blog than by starting with the bag that looks, smells, and will probably taste like those little woodchips you add to your grill for some extra barbeque flavor?

There was no overwhelming smell when opening the package, and a fun assortment of pieces were found within. The brown terd-like pieces and black balls could almost visually pass as real candy, especially when mixed in with chocolate-covered raisins.

I started off with the silver log and was pleasantly surprised. Not only was it not the worst thing in the whole wide world, but it was actually pleasant. It wasn't even hot/spicy; the 2/3 rating may as well have been 0/3.

The licquorice was very subtle, and some other (non-awful) earthen flavors came out shortly thereafter. Perhaps that's why they call it firewood? But things took a turn for the worst when I bit into it. The sensation was much like biting into a Cow Tale (i.e., cold, creamy, and soft) , but the flavor was... intense. I don't know if it was just a big pocket of salt, dirt, or pure awful, but I couldn't do it. Tried as I might, I had to spit.

The black log and black ball didn't fare any better, as they had the same gooey center. The brown-terds? I actually managed to finish one of them. I might even go back for another.

This rates as almost-edible.

34 comments:

  1. LOL! This blog is definitely going to my RSS reader!
    I LOVE salmiakki/salt liquorice candy. I'm sure you will too when you have gotten used to it!

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  2. Heh. This should be fun.
    Apparently Salmiakki is the same as Dutch 'drop'. It is an acquired taste, I agree. I love it, though.

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  4. Heathen! damn you! Burn in hell fire for your blashemy (with tons of salmiakki ofcourse)! =)

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  5. I have to say, I never understood those measurements of "heat" in Turkish Peppers, the hottest called "original" has three of the little burning bushes, and they're blander than Tabasco.

    Well, at least the originals taste like proper salmiakki.

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  6. Salmiakki is usually delicious, but those firewood things are pretty mediocre IMO. Also, I agree with Markus that the heat indicator is pretty useless.

    You should try out the salmiakki chocolates or the "Dracula piller" next. If you don't like them then you're truly a heathen! :)

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  7. I have to agree with previous: Dracula Pilleri is surely the top notch salmiakki ever.

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  8. I love daily wtf and I will definitely read this site, too. A wtf in whole. And I don't like licquor at all...

    Have fun tasting it... ;)

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  9. Oh my god! Where did you get all those sweets? http://www.suomikauppa.fi I guess?

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  10. Am I really the only one who is going to mantion that "turd" is spelled with a "u"?

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  11. I agree with Peter - we need video evidence of the depths of foulness to which you subject yourself.

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  12. I agree with you about the Firewood candies. They are ok (I like their "chewability") but nothing that special anyway... I must join Anonymous in wondering where you got all the Finnish salmiakki you're posing in the picture with? :)

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  13. Oh, I love Salmiak, and love the people who think they can eat it without being adjusted to flavour.

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  14. > Oh my god! Where did you get all those sweets?

    http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Souvenir-Potpourri-Salmiak-Attack.aspx

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  15. Malaco's Djunglevrål ("Suola-apinat" :)) was what I used in order to help my American friend get the taste of Salmiakki. Maybe you should try those.

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  16. I love salmiak candies... and Turkisk Peppar used to be one of my favorites. Always bought them when travelling, to have with me to chew in lonely hotel nights far away from home :)

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  17. They didn't send you
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmiakki_Koskenkorva
    !?

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  18. I'm the wife of Jakob Engblom and want to add the reason why Jakob eats liquorice when travelling. It is because he's not allowed to eat it at home. I puke from the bare smell. Yuck!!


    I feel truly sorry for the awful experiences you are about to have.

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  19. However, "Tyrkisk Peber" isn't Finnish, but Danish. Which would explain the almost-edible rating.

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  20. I'm just wondering what kind of "candy" does the writer like then. The "colored sugar" type I guess. At least that's the only available type in most regions of the world.

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  21. That "Turkish Peber Firewood" -mix is just hideous. The taste of the candy in the mix is something I do not want to experience again.

    I do understand that salmiakki is something people have divided opinions about, but that crap (Turkish Peber Firewood) is not really a proper introduction...

    ...original Turkish Peber, tho not the best thing available, is a far more delicious treat than what was sampled here.

    My 5c as a person who likes salmiakki.

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  22. @Ian Am I really the only one who is going to mention that "mention" is spelled with an "e"?

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  23. " The brown-terds? I actually managed to finish one of them. I might even go back for another."

    Ha - you're done. No point in resisting. You'll end up liking the darned stuff eventually. Soon you will find yourself looking for a salmiakki-fix every day, as your lips turn black and your sense of humour becomes (even more) twisted.

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  24. MaidenInTheWoodsMarch 3, 2010 at 2:19 PM

    Oh, yes, Tyrkisk Peber is indeed Danish. And I have a bottle of Tyrkisk Peber flavored vodka I offer to people who swear they will drink anything. No one's ever asked for seconds, though.

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  25. Go Alex, go! We can only watch and wait with bated breath for your next Salmiakki experience! (And silently be grateful for brave men like you, who stand between our palates and those things we might have accidentally tasted, all unknowing!)

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  26. Where are the updates?! It has been a month, yearning for more...

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  27. Those look delicious. One of the best parts about eating genuine licorice is sharing it with someone, watching their horrified disgust while you continue to eat with a straight face, enjoying it immensely.

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  28. Go with the ORIGINAL. I buy FIREWOOD because it has the grey ones . . takes days to eat the rest, as they are just plain crap :P

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  29. The original Tyrkisk Peber is my favourite candy!! I also like the Djunglevrål that Harri mentioned :)
    We get some of the candy that you've reviewed on this blog in Norway, and it's one of the few things I miss when I'm out travelling. At the minute I'm in Australia for a year, and the few places they have some sort of salt liquorice I don't think it's salty enough! Although I did find Tyrkik Peber and Djunglevrål at a small shop in Sydney!

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    1. Oh Lilly, please tell us where in Sydney you found the candy. I really want some and don't know where i could buy it. I'm interested in Salmiakki, Peber, Pepper drops, etc - anything that is strongly liquorice tasting. That's how i came to this blog in the first place. Please help!

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  30. I love the originals and honestly this firewood version is almost as good. Delicious!

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  31. These are so delicious, I like the black long ones best, its a shame that mostly the package is full of grey and brown ones, I don't like them so much :/

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